Economic Consequences of Terrorism and Natural Disasters: the Computable General Equilibrium Approach

Speaker: 
Peter B. Dixon
Date/Time: 
Monday, December 7, 2015 - 12:00
Location: 
RGL 100 (Ralph & Goldy Lewis Hall, 650 Childs Way, Los Angeles, CA 90089)

To watch the presentation click here.

Abstract: Peter Dixon’s presentation will start with a brief comparison of Input-Output and CGE modeling.  This will be followed by a description of USAGE and USAGE-TERM.  USAGE is a detailed national CGE model of the United States developed at the Centre of Policy Studies (CoPS), Victoria University, with support from the U.S. International Trade Commission and other Federal government agencies.  USAGE-TERM is a multi-region version of USAGE developed at CoPS with support from CREATE.  The third part of the presentation will be an illustrative application of USAGE-TERM demonstrating the relevance of the model in terrorism analysis.  The final part will focus on how the modeling capacity of USAGE-TERM can be made available in a timely fashion to decision makers.  The presentation will draw on the chapter with the same name authored by Dixon, Rimmer, Wittwer, Rose and Heatwole that will appear in a book edited by Abbas, von Winterfeldt and Tambe to be published by Cambridge University Press. 

Bio: Professor Dixon is known for his work in computable general equilibrium modelling.  Together with colleagues at the IMPACT Project and the Centre of Policy Studies, he created the ORANI model and its dynamic successor, MONASH.  These models have been prominent in the Australian economic debate for 35 years and have been used as templates for the development of other models throughout the world.  He is the principal author of the ORANI and MONASH books published in the North Holland Contributions series in 1982 and 2002.  In recent years he has led the development of the USAGE model of the U.S. which is being used by the U. S. International Trade Commission and the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Energy, Transportation and Homeland Security, and by the Canadian Embassy in Washington DC.  He is currently professor in the Centre of Policy Studies, Victoria University, Melbourne