Research Seminars

Research Seminars

Sorry but there are no Research Seminars currently available for display. Please check back frequently for updates.

Speaker:
Robert Olshanky
Date/Time:
September 7, 2017 - 2:00 PM
Location:
RTH 324
Abstract: Major natural disasters are rare, but their aftermath can change the fortunes of a city or region forever. This book and its companion Policy Focus Report  (co-authored with Laurie Johnson) identify lessons from different parts of the world to help communities and government leaders better organize for recovery after future disasters. The authors consider the processes and outcomes of community... More »
Speaker:
Stephen P. A. Brown
Date/Time:
February 13, 2017 - 12:00 PM
Location:
RTH 326
Abstract: Formerly the director of energy economics at the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, Stephen has numerous published articles about energy markets and policy and microeconomic public policy.  He an editor for Energy Policy, on the advisory board for the journal Energy Economics, and a regular participant in meetings of the Stanford Energy Modeling Forum. He previously served on the American... More »
Speaker:
Dr. Jasson Nassios & Professor James A. Giesecke
Date/Time:
December 2, 2016 - 2:00 PM
Location:
RGL 209
Abstract: Abstract Economic consequence analysis is one of many inputs to terrorism contingency planning. Computable general equilibrium (CGE) models are being used more frequently in these analyses, in part because of their capacity to accommodate high levels of event-specific detail. In modeling the potential economic effects of a hypothetical terrorist event, two broad sets of shocks are required: (1)... More »
Speaker:
Peter B. Dixon
Date/Time:
December 7, 2015 - 12:00 PM
Location:
RGL 100 (Ralph & Goldy Lewis Hall, 650 Childs Way, Los Angeles, CA 90089)
Abstract: To watch the presentation click here. Abstract: Peter Dixon’s presentation will start with a brief comparison of Input-Output and CGE modeling.  This will be followed by a description of USAGE and USAGE-TERM.  USAGE is a detailed national CGE model of the United States developed at the Centre of Policy Studies (CoPS), Victoria University, with support from the U.S. International Trade Commission... More »
Speaker:
Sule Guney
Date/Time:
August 5, 2015 - 2:00 PM
Location:
RTH 306
Abstract: Ambiguity aversion refers to a pattern of preferences favoring options with known winning probabilities (i.e. risky) over those with unknown winning probabilities (i.e. ambiguous), even though normative theories imply indifference. In a couple of studies, we aimed to explore how different strategic environments influence people’s beliefs about winning probabilities and hence their decisions under... More »
Speaker:
Leon Yang Zhu
Date/Time:
July 1, 2015 - 2:00 PM
Location:
RTH 306
Abstract: We characterize the optimal contract between a principal and a risk-neutral, wealth-constrained agent when an adverse selection problem follows a moral hazard problem. The optimal contract in this setting often is more steeply sloped for the largest output levels than is the optimal contract in either the standard moral hazard setting or the standard adverse selection setting. The large... More »
Speaker:
Miao Pan
Date/Time:
June 24, 2015 - 3:00 PM
Location:
EEB 248
Abstract: With over 770 million GPS-enabled smartphones, location Based Service (LBS) has begun to permeate the entire mobile space. Although LBS greatly benefits the daily life of mobile device users, it has introduced significant threats to privacy. In an LBS system, even under the protection of pseudonyms, users may become victims of inference attacks, where an adversary reveals a user’s real identity... More »
Speaker:
Manel Baucells
Date/Time:
June 17, 2015 - 2:00 PM
Location:
RTH 306
Abstract: Several consumer choice models account for anomalies in consumption-payment decisions. We consider four such models, including Prelec and Loewenstein 1998 double-entry model and Koszegi and Rabin 2006 reference dependent model. We observe that these models make distinct predictions regarding how different anomalies ought to be related or unrelated. In a controlled experiment we elicit the... More »
Speaker:
Scott Farrow
Date/Time:
June 2, 2015 - 11:00 AM
Location:
EEB 248
Abstract: The presentation links work on meta-model selection, such as that between a multi-attribute utility model and a benefit-cost analysis, with the finer grained development of an economics based model for cyber security investments.   The cyber-security model seeks to link a taxonomy of cyber attack types to micro-economic structures and economic damages broadly considered.  Both projects are in... More »
Speaker:
Arunesh Sinha
Date/Time:
May 20, 2015 - 2:00 PM
Location:
RTH 306
Abstract: An effective way of preventing attacks in secure areas is to screen for threats (people, objects) before entry, e.g., screening of airport passengers. However, screening every entity at the same level may be ineffective and undesirable. The challenge then is to find a dynamic approach for screening, allowing for more effective use of limited screening resources, leading to improved security. We... More »
Speaker:
William Siembieda
Date/Time:
May 20, 2015 - 9:30 AM
Location:
RTH 324
Abstract: Multi-hazard mitigation planning crosses boundaries and requires participation from multiple actors, mostly from the public sector.  Cross-sector communications emerges as a powerful tool to foster the partnership needed for boundary crossing.   The end goal is integration of effort among actors at all scales.   The process of  designing and assembling a  FEMA standard and enhanced state level... More »
Speaker:
Max Henrion
Date/Time:
April 14, 2015 - 2:00 PM
Location:
PHE 333
Abstract: Like many issues of energy and environment, there was much controversy about how to decommission California's 27 offshore oil platforms. Complete removal was required by the original leases, but would cost over a billion dollars, and destroy the rich marine ecosystems that have grown up around these platforms. A decision analysis provided stakeholders with insights that helped form consensus for... More »
Speaker:
Than Nguyen
Date/Time:
April 1, 2015 - 2:00 PM
Location:
PHE 333
Abstract:   Research on Stackelberg Security Games (SSG) has recently shifted to green security domains, e.g., protecting wildlife from illegal poaching. Previous research on this topic has advocated the use of behavioral (bounded rationality) models of adversaries in SSG. We, for the first time, provides validation of these behavioral models based on real-world data from a wildlife park. We next introduce... More »
Speaker:
Gilberto Montibeller/Detlof von Winterfeldt
Date/Time:
March 25, 2015 - 2:00 PM
Location:
RTH 306
Abstract: Behavioral decision research has demonstrated that judgments and decisions of ordinary people and experts are subject to numerous biases. Decision and risk analysis were designed to improve judgments and decisions and to overcome many of these biases. However, when eliciting model components and parameters from decision-makers or experts, analysts often face the very biases they are trying to... More »
Speaker:
Arie Kapteyn
Date/Time:
February 4, 2015 - 1:45 PM
Location:
RTH 306
Abstract: This paper documents consumers' difficulty valuing life annuities (paper attached). We show that the prices at which people are willing to buy annuities are substantially below the prices at which they are willing to sell them, a finding we show is not attributable to an endowment effect. We also find that buy values are negatively correlated with sell values and that the sell-buy valuation... More »
Speaker:
Henry Willis
Date/Time:
February 2, 2015 - 2:00 PM
Location:
RTH 324
Abstract: Biosurveillance provides information that improves decisions about mitigating the effects of disease outbreaks and bioterrorism. Applying two standard risk and decision analysis tools to biosurveillance -decision trees and value-of-information analysis-- I demonstrate an approach for evaluating strategies to enhance biosurveillance and to improve decisions about whether and how to act after... More »
Speaker:
Amy Ward
Date/Time:
January 28, 2015 - 2:00 PM
Location:
RTH 306
Abstract: We present several system design questions, and discuss their analysis.  Our purpose is to understand which types of models are most relevant for the applications of interest to CREATE.  We begin with a more classical network control problem, in which we must decide how to schedule jobs for processing at different stations in a network.  Although there is a broad literature on such problems,... More »